Monthly Archives: August 2017

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Nasi Lemak Sushi

I’ve featured nasi lemak before – it’s a favourite local dish, of Malay origin, made with coconut rice, fish, egg, cucumber and a spicy sauce.

Often it comes packaged in a banana leaf for lunch, although I have also seen it deconstructed and layered so it looks very much like a slice of lasagne. Either way, it is very tasty.

This, however, was a completely new take on the classic, nasi lemak served as sushi. The egg – slices of omelette rather than fried – and the cucumber were rolled up with the rice into a maki, with the crispy fish and the sambal sauce dabbed on top of each slice. It was delicious and here, unlike the banana leaf version, you could actually eat the (nori) wrapping.

At S$8 for a serving of 8 pieces, it is slightly more expensive than ‘real’ sushi, but for novelty value it was worth even cent.


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Double Thai Tea

Category : Food

This ‘2 for the price of 1’ idea amused me greatly, and the slightly unusual flavours were a bonus.

The way the container is divided means you can have 2 different flavours in essentially the same space, and the lid has holes for a different straw in each half.

The cup holds a large amount of liquid, so I suppose this is a good way of sharing the cost of a cold drink with a friend. Alternatively, you could use both straws at once for an intriguing new taste sensation.

I went for honeydew melon and bandung flavour teas (this last being based on a rose flavoured syrup). They were both really sugary but still a lot of fun, and although I couldn’t finish either I was glad to have given this a try.


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Candyfloss Burritos

Pastel is clearly the new black, at least when it comes to food trends aimed at the youth of Singapore.

The latest, offering itself as a ‘rainbow unicorn snack’ is dubbed the ‘candyfloss burrito’, although as far as I could tell it comprised neither of these items (and I shall gloss over the missing unicorn…)

Somehow, at least in Singapore, ‘burrito’ has become shorthand for anything wrapped into a roll of some kind. Hence the popularity of the ‘sushi burrito’, which, disappointingly, means no more than either your standard maki or a Californian hand roll.

Here, the ‘candyfloss’, whilst crunchy with sugar, seemed to be made of shredded vegetable of some sort. The ‘burritos’ were simply crepes. Both had been coloured with varying degrees of success and without the apparent addition of any flavour.

You can buy the component parts in package form, ready to put together yourself, but in such quantities that you would have to be planning a party. If you buy a tray of 3, you are advised to eat them within 8 minutes. I’m not sure what happens if you don’t, because I managed only a few bites before consigning them to the nearest bin.


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Shiok Ah Ccino

August 9th is National Day in Singapore, and it’s always accompanied by massive displays of pride in the achievements of this tiny city state. And that covers not just the National Day Parade or the Singapore flag flying proudly from most residential windows, but special edition Singapore-themed items ranging from red and white T shirts to decorated cakes.

Somewhere in between comes the Shiok Ah Ccino, a remarkable, and Singapore exclusive, offering from Starbucks. Drawing on several of those local delicacies familiar in kopi tiams around the island, they have managed to create a drink that perfectly blends the Starbucks signature frappuccino with tastes that are completely Singaporean.

So the regular frappucino is blended with and the whipped cream topped by the thick sweetness of gula melaka, which is a palm sugar syrup.  The main ingredient, however, is a large scoop of coffee jelly shreds, which are an interesting take on that slightly bitter tasting local favourite which goes by the English name of ‘grass jelly’ even though it is black rather than green in colour. There’s crunchy coconut on top as the finishing touch.

Shiok, incidentally, is the local way of saying that something is really good.

It took me a couple of days to work up to tasting this one, and I did not manage to drink it all, but it was actually quite nice, despite the ‘exclusive’ price of S$7.90 for the smallest cup. Of course it helps that I really like gula melaka… What defeated me in the end was the coffee jelly, since there was so much of it that I could not get a mouthful of the drink itself without several strands sliding up the straw, and I found that horribly disconcerting.

Still, it is clearly super popular with the locals and it’s a great and rather flattering idea from Starbucks. I look forward to seeing if it reappears next year.


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