Facial Massage Cream

Facial Massage Cream

Facial massage is something most Western women only experience as a small part of a regular facial, tucked in between the cleansing, the treatment and the moisturising at the end. In India, however, it is a mainstay of the typical beauty regime, and usually involves natural plant-based products rather than high-tech chemical formulas.

I found this facial massage cream in Mumbai, ready prepared in a handy tube, and thought it well worth taking home to try. From Jovees Herbal Care, it contains lemon, orange, papaya enzymes, wheatgerm, sugar cane, avocado, pineapple extract and vitamin E, each ‘carefully chosen to help skin regenerate its natural defence’.

According to the packaging, the fruit enzymes help soften and heal the skin, the vitamins restore smooth radiance and collagen elasticity, and the whole product encourages lifting of dead skin cells to leave the complexion glowing.

Keen to give it all a go, I was stopped short by the instruction to use the cream with raw milk and massage for 20 minutes. Apparently plain water is an acceptable alternative, but still – 20 minutes is rather a long time… I did manage a few minutes though, and found the suggested circular movements very therapeutic and relaxing.

I was expecting this product to be rich and hydrating, but adding water actually turned it from cream into milk, and rather than being absorbed into the skin it needed wiping away with wet cotton pads. Washing your face at the end is recommended, which means you then have to apply yet more cream to moisturise your skin.

Never mind, I liked this quite a lot and will be using it again.


Cream to Powder (and vv)

cc-3 cream-lip-1 its-2

Makeup which turns from  one texture to another  is popping up in the product lines of several Asian cosmetics companies.

You can get powder cheek and lip colours which develop a creamy consistency as they react with the moisture on your skin, then also a stick base cream which dries into powder within seconds. Both types are interesting, unusual, and seem to work very nicely – the finished effect is no different from what you get with normal cosmetics, but the way they transform themselves is the selling point.

We tried the Za CC stick, which is described as a one-step day cream to finishing powder which should last all day for a shine free and pore-less complexion. (Za, incidentally, aims to help ‘women who aspire to ‘cosmopolitan city life’ gain the confident and attractive beauty look’.)

This particular product apparently contains both stretch-fit powder and smart oil control powder, which are activated as you blend the cream in with your fingers. Daughter #2 said she liked it, although she would probably wear it like foundation over concealer rather than simply as a day cream. It comes in just 2 colours, natural and light.

The cheek and lip variety are available from a number of companies, but we tried only 2, both of which provided plenty of novelty and were nice enough to be used again.

Touch In Sol, a Korean company whose brand is described as suiting ‘Ladies who Wannabe – Twinkle Star, Sexy & Cute, Classy & Lovely’, make creams which turn into powder, which are possibly better for your cheeks than your lips but which can be used for either.

It’s Skin is also a Korean firm, whose little bottles of powder turn into cream on both lips and cheeks. There are 5 different shades, which are described as vivid but which we found to be fairly subtle unless you applied several layers. The product isn’t sticky as you’d expect, and feels more like a lip tint than the thicker cream of a lipstick. This one got a big thumbs up.


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