Puppy Dog Ice Creams

Puppy Dog Ice Creams

We’ve just begun the Lunar Year of the Dog, so canine-themed gifts and treats are a very popular buy in Asia right now.

My favourite so far is this amazingly detailed ice cream puppy on a stick, a snip at S$3 from the I-Bing pop up at April’s Bakery. To be honest, the face and fur are so realistic that it is slightly disconcerting to eat – a classic ‘man bites dog’ moment (a story which all former trainee journalists will recognise…)

There are three flavours: the golden retriever is earl grey tea, the Dalmatian is cookies and cream, and the corgi I chose is Ovaltine, albeit rather mild.

April’s is actually a Thai brand, and I-Bing is a sister company which seems to be testing the waters here in Singapore before branching out alone. Their slogan is a hilarious and enticing ‘a fruity frenzy of frozen fun’, which seems to encapsulate their usp perfectly.

The dogs are special, but a whole series of fruit shaped, fruit flavoured frozen treats are on the main menu, from mango and mangosteen to a very fragrant durian.

I-Bing also has some adorable flower pots with colourful roses, each one set in a bed of Oreo cookie ‘soil’. These are also a ridiculously cheap S$3, and come with a cute miniature garden shovel with which to scoop them up. The different coloured blooms are pink milk, pink lemonade, and blueberry mint flavours, the last of these being slightly strange but when it looks this good, who cares?

If you don’t want to eat these right away, they can be packed up with dry ice and whisked home within an hour, where you can pop them into your own freezer for another day. I am rather hoping that I-Bing comes to Singapore to stay.

  


Chipstar Chocolates

Here’s another of those ‘only in Asia’ snacks which seem to defy logic. Maybe I am just too conservative in my tastes (although anyone who has been on a Julietours would probably dispute this…) but I find it very hard to enjoy snacks which combine sweet and savoury in the same mouthful.

But hey, I like Chipstar crisps, which are pretty much identical to Pringles and so dangerously addictive. And of course I cannot conceive of a world without chocolate. As I did not actively dislike some of the items I have previously tasted combining these 2 things, and I am unable to walk past bizarre new offerings like these when I spot them on a Japanese convenience store shelf, here they are…

What you get is exactly what you see in the picture on the packet – chocolate truffles coated in chocolate then rolled in crushed potato chips. Decidedly strange by Western standards, but not as ghastly as you might imagine. In fact, not that far removed from what the taste might be if you rolled these in crushed almonds or peanuts instead.

That said, these are not the nicest chocolate truffles underneath the chips, although no worse than you’d expect for the price. But having tried them once, I will be perfectly happy to leave them on the shelf next time.


Fairy Puff Ice Cream Toastie

The main draw here is the machine which makes this treat possible – a sort of toasted sandwich maker but with a domed lid. Somehow it manages to toast and seal 2 halves of a bread bun whilst NOT melting the ice cream that forms the filling.

Everything else is window dressing and here there was some serious ‘unicorn’ going on.

The bread was a riot of colourful swirls, the ice cream was bright blue, and the decoration was multi-coloured sprinkles.

In days gone by (and sometimes still today if you are lucky enough to find a traditional ‘ice cream uncle’) a scoop of ice cream in Singapore came folded inside a slice of pink and green coloured bread.

As a modern update, this rainbow ‘fairy puff’ manages perfectly both to hark back to the old ways and appeal to the inexplicable current trend for all things cute and fairy-tale. The S$8 price tag was a shocker, though.

And don’t ask me what it actually tasted like…


Chocolate ‘Chip’ Ice Cream

Chocolate chip ice cream, but not as you know it!

The ‘chips’ are actually bits of crinkle cut potato crisp, mixed with the molten chocolate into which the soft serve cone is dipped.

Chocolate covered potato chips are increasingly common – a lot of Asian confectionary companies are now producing them in a variety of different of different forms and flavours – so I suppose this is a logical next step.

There are 2 versions here, so you can choose either milk chocolate on vanilla ice cream or white chocolate on frozen yoghurt. A serving costs just 18 baht, from KFC in Thailand.

The ice cream is pretty horrible, of course (what would you expect at that price?) and it had a disconcerting way of forcing itself out in shiny beads through the chocolate coating. The crispy bits in the chocolate are surprisingly palatable, however. Eating this was rather like eating one of those ice creams with bits of crushed nut in the chocolate coating, except these crunchy bits left a potato rather than an almond aftertaste. It’s obviously very popular, and honestly, not half as bad as I was expecting.


Candyfloss Burritos

Pastel is clearly the new black, at least when it comes to food trends aimed at the youth of Singapore.

The latest, offering itself as a ‘rainbow unicorn snack’ is dubbed the ‘candyfloss burrito’, although as far as I could tell it comprised neither of these items (and I shall gloss over the missing unicorn…)

Somehow, at least in Singapore, ‘burrito’ has become shorthand for anything wrapped into a roll of some kind. Hence the popularity of the ‘sushi burrito’, which, disappointingly, means no more than either your standard maki or a Californian hand roll.

Here, the ‘candyfloss’, whilst crunchy with sugar, seemed to be made of shredded vegetable of some sort. The ‘burritos’ were simply crepes. Both had been coloured with varying degrees of success and without the apparent addition of any flavour.

You can buy the component parts in package form, ready to put together yourself, but in such quantities that you would have to be planning a party. If you buy a tray of 3, you are advised to eat them within 8 minutes. I’m not sure what happens if you don’t, because I managed only a few bites before consigning them to the nearest bin.


Ginger KitKat Balls

I can never resist the lure of a new type of KitKat, and there are so many amazing and/or outrageous varieties to be had in Japan that your taste buds can go into shock (wasabi and soy sauce, anyone??)

These ginger tea flavoured KitKat balls were a welcome contrast to some of the odder things I have sampled recently. They are new and different, but taste just the way you’d expect – slightly sweet and slightly spicy like a warming mug of ginger tea mixed with chocolate. The little bit of biscuit crunch is a bonus.

It’s always a treat to find something that is unusual but not a challenge to consume, and I really enjoyed these. Like most of the KitKat flavours it is probably just a short-lived special, but whilst it is around I will be buying it where I can.


Ninja Ice Cream

You know you always wanted to try ice cream ‘based on ninja stealth and invisibility technique’…. Here was my chance, with the exclusive ‘black gold’ cone from Kyorollen, at Emporium in Bangkok.

It comes at the premium price of 159 Thai baht, but for that you get a creation which is put together by hand like an artistic masterpiece and served in its own wooden stand.

Everything here is black – the cone made with sumi bamboo charcoal, the kuromame black soya beans, the sticky ball of mochi, even the ‘raw’ chocolate cube. Well, I suppose the ice cream itself was slightly on the grey side, but considering it is made with the famously creamy milk from Hokkaido, this was not surprising.

I could probably have done without the soya bean and mocha components of this treat, but they looked great and I very much enjoyed the rest. Japanese ‘raw’ chocolate is always delicious and this one had a fudgy texture which I particularly enjoyed.

It was an expensive indulgence but definitely worth it.


Cherry Blossom Chocolate

It isn’t even cherry blossom season any more, but I had never seen this version of Dars before so felt honour bound to try it.

To be honest, I am not a great fan of the sakura taste, although I have consumed it in tea, ice cream, and no end of delightful cakes where there is a piece of dried blossom as decoration. There’s nothing wrong with it, there just isn’t much of a flavour there to form an opinion on. So apart from the pretty colour, there doesn’t seem much point.

Here, the predominant flavour is the white chocolate, with just a hint of something extra which is hard to define. The pink colour is not particularly striking, either.

No, I wasn’t impressed, I only ate 1 piece and will not be buying this again.


Eyescream

This is so silly it was irresistible.

New in Singapore, apparently from Barcelona, this is shaved ice cream presented like a cute and swirly monster.

Big cylinders of the ice cream are stored in freezers at the back of the stall – choose your flavour and it is popped into a machine which spins to carve the top off in big folded ‘shavings’. Next you choose 2 toppings from the vast range under the counter, then let the server bring it all to life with 2 big sugar eyes. There you have it, a sweet treat to chuckle over for less than $7.

I went for chocolate ice cream with chocolate chips and salted caramel sauce. But there’s a huge choice, and I could have had wildberry yoghurt, mango or cheesecake, with the likes of gummy bears, sugared peanuts, cookie crumbs or marshmallows on top.

The ice cream was a bit watery and tasteless for me, but this is a cool idea and clearly very popular. First in Asia – you heard it here!

 


Instant Cake

Category : Food

Freshly baked cake in 60 seconds… sounds too good to be true? Believe me, it really, really is.

This turned up on the shelves of Cheers convenience store and I could not resist, even though the $2 price tag should have been ample warning.

In theory it is a fine idea… empty the sachet of powder into the tub, add milk (or water) to the marked line, stir well then microwave for 1 minute. Hey presto – instant cake!

In practise it was all another story. It would have been very much more helpful to mark the line on the inside rather than the outside of the tub. It took rather longer than 60 seconds to stir the powder and milk into an acceptable consistency. The lid was so flimsy that it came with a warning that it was a burning hazard and therefore unsuitable for use in the microwave. And the 60 seconds baking time had to be followed by 120 seconds cooling off time.

You will note that I have not mentioned the taste or texture yet. You can probably take a good guess at those. This was supposed to be a chocolate cake but it ended up something like a dark brown, slightly damp bath sponge. I managed one spoonful before it went in the bin.


Search

Food

Beauty

Fashion/Accessories

Other