Cleansing Powder

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Cleansing Powder

Always a fan of skin care products that can be transported easily in hand baggage, I was intrigued by these tiny cones of cleansing scrub. No liquids here to consider as you decant items into small containers for a holiday.

From Korean company Skylake, this is a weekly scrub rather than a daily cleanser, but is still a space saving and disposable item which is easy to take along on a trip. Each little cone is barely 4cm long and contains just 1.5 grams of powder. And with a box of 30 costing exactly S$30, that means just one dollar each, which isn’t bad.

It works very nicely, too. You empty the powder into your hand, mix it with a little water, and massage onto your face for 3 to 5 minutes before rinsing away. It not only exfoliates but apparently polishes away dead skin and impurities too, to ‘refine pores, lighten freckles and pigmentations, promoting a fresh, radiant and glowing complexion’.

The powder is supposed to contain oriental herbs, and some translation of the ingredients list revealed these to be skullcap, marsh parsley, azuki and mung beans. The only problem is, the combined scent of these, together with the various added cleansing agents, reminded me strongly of curry powder. Which is, let’s be honest, not exactly what you want to be smelling of when you’ve washed your face.

My skin did feel smoother, though, and applying regular face creams afterwards seemed to mask the curry smell very efficiently. All in all, I think I shall continue to use these.


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Facial Mask Powder

I rather liked the idea of a DIY face mask that you mix up from the powder in the sachet. The claim that this contains pearl and gold, and the shimmer of both powder and mask, was a bonus, although the ingredient list revealed a distinct lack of actual gold. The pearl was there, though, which for the price was more than I was expecting.

The mask is supposed to provide gentle cleansing to reveal a ‘beautiful and radiant’ skin, and the main component is diatomaceous earth, a natural silica mineral which is supposed to have endless benefits for the skin including helping to promote collagen production. This had to be worth trying.

Of course, mixing up your own mask can be pretty messy. Here, the powder was so fine it settled in a fine dusting over everything in blast range as I tried to pour it out of the sachet, yet perversely refused to mix properly with the water, so it still had small lumps despite my best efforts to make it smooth. If I had another one, I would try adding far less water than the amount suggested on the packet.

Contrary to expectations, though, it did stay on my face for the recommended 15 minutes and was even easy to peel off in a thin, shiny film. I was half hoping I could use the left over mix another time, but this too set solid in the bottom of the bowl.

My skin felt very smooth afterwards and my pores appeared smaller, but there were some red patches on my nose and round my hairline, where the mask had been spread very thinly and so dried into a pale clay-like coating rather than the plasticky film elsewhere. If I manage to find another of these (it came from Bangkok) then I will have a far better idea of how to use it.


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Watermelon Powder Spray

You may well ask.

I saw this in Bangkok and was intrigued, although in retrospect I think I should probably have left it on the shelf.

Watermelon powder spray is supposedly made with 100% Thai herbs and seems to be some sort of a breath freshener. The directions on the packet say: ‘once you feel uncomfortable in your mouth or throat, directly spray on them. It can use several times a day depending on personal situation.’

The powder comes in a small bottle with a nozzle, and you spray it on by squeezing the sides so it puffs out of the top. This is not a particularly pleasant sensation, and reminded me of those Japanese medications which come as a sachet of powder that you tip into your mouth – infinitely more difficult to swallow than a tablet or a spoonful of linctus.

What comes out of this bottle looks like brown dust and has a bitter taste which did not appear to sweeten or freshen my breath. I really didn’t like it and will not be using it again.


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Cream to Powder (and vv)

cc-3 cream-lip-1 its-2

Makeup which turns from  one texture to another  is popping up in the product lines of several Asian cosmetics companies.

You can get powder cheek and lip colours which develop a creamy consistency as they react with the moisture on your skin, then also a stick base cream which dries into powder within seconds. Both types are interesting, unusual, and seem to work very nicely – the finished effect is no different from what you get with normal cosmetics, but the way they transform themselves is the selling point.

We tried the Za CC stick, which is described as a one-step day cream to finishing powder which should last all day for a shine free and pore-less complexion. (Za, incidentally, aims to help ‘women who aspire to ‘cosmopolitan city life’ gain the confident and attractive beauty look’.)

This particular product apparently contains both stretch-fit powder and smart oil control powder, which are activated as you blend the cream in with your fingers. Daughter #2 said she liked it, although she would probably wear it like foundation over concealer rather than simply as a day cream. It comes in just 2 colours, natural and light.

The cheek and lip variety are available from a number of companies, but we tried only 2, both of which provided plenty of novelty and were nice enough to be used again.

Touch In Sol, a Korean company whose brand is described as suiting ‘Ladies who Wannabe – Twinkle Star, Sexy & Cute, Classy & Lovely’, make creams which turn into powder, which are possibly better for your cheeks than your lips but which can be used for either.

It’s Skin is also a Korean firm, whose little bottles of powder turn into cream on both lips and cheeks. There are 5 different shades, which are described as vivid but which we found to be fairly subtle unless you applied several layers. The product isn’t sticky as you’d expect, and feels more like a lip tint than the thicker cream of a lipstick. This one got a big thumbs up.


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Mood Boosting Makeup

powder-4 blush-3 powder-2

I bought these (in Bangkok, bizarrely) because the whole idea of makeup which can change your mood was simply hilarious. Further research gave me a whole back story to this brand which made it even more interesting.

Physician’s Formula is American, has been around since 1937, and was apparently started by allergy doctor Frank Crandall because his wife had sensitive skin.

So these are high quality, hypo allergenic products which also try to be innovative and fun. The blusher and powder here contain plant extracts which are supposed to mimic the effect of endorphins to boost your mood, whilst also providing a healthy glow.

As you can see from the photos, the palettes are a delightful array of different coloured heart shapes, and also have the uplifting scent of violets. There is even a handy brush and mirror in a compartment underneath.

At US$11.95 to 13.95, they are not the cheapest cosmetics you can buy, but they have to be some of the more unusual. I have had nothing but good reports from daughter #1, who tried them first, and will be on the lookout for more from this firm.


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